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Tuesday, June 17th, 2014 20:06 Comments Off

Filmistaan

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Ben Kenigsberg(New York Times): "Filmistaan" a little at a time morphs into a serious disquisition forward Indo-Pakistani relations and the delaying animus from the nations' 1947 apportionment.

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Tuesday, June 17th, 2014 20:06 Comments Off

Burt’s Buzz

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Reviews:
Kate Taylor(Globe and Mail): In its tight point of convergence on the man, and its leisurely degree of progress, the film creates an intriguing representation of a figure caught between the Sixties and the favorably attentive, and the self and the picture..
Moira MacDonald(Seattle Times): Shavitz is undoubtedly one intriguing fellow, but "Burt's Buzz" at no time quite finds what makes him check off.
Linda Barnard(Toronto Star): Shapiro (How to Start Your Own Country) lets the untruth play out in a meandering the that echoes Shavitz's be nearly equal to life.
Neil Genzlinger(New York Times): The film leaves the impression that it's effective the version of its subject's life that he wants us to give heed to.
Sheri Linden(Los Angeles Times): A assured hirsute fellow in an engineer's head-dress, the one whose enigmatic kisser graces the Burt's Bees logo, is, it turns not at home, the real deal. And he's besides of a character than any marketing guru could invent.
Abby Garnett(Village Voice): When a cadre of screaming fans in fake beards and bee costumes compliment Burt at a Taiwan airport, it's unthinkable not to marvel at his odd existence.
Brent Simon(Shockya.com): If in that place was a film school class with regard to burying the lede, it would be difficult to think of a besides fitting example than this aimless doc, that gets to its most essential questions barely an hour into its running time or leaves them entirely unasked.
Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat(Spirituality and Practice): A documentary through a Maine recluse who at 76 years of old ~ makes public appearances as the icon of the Burt's Bees reproach..
Nora Lee Mandel(Film-Forward.com): Laconically recognizes his deal to be a symbol as latest reinvention of himself. Equally lovely and annoying, his quirkiness and stubbornness put down to the company's confer a favor on.
David Nusair(Reel Film Reviews): …~y uneven yet entertaining little documentary.

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Tuesday, June 17th, 2014 20:06 Comments Off

Elena

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Reviews:
Sheri Linden(Los Angeles Times): A representation of cinematic performance art, with totality the self-consciousness that suggests – a sibling delight story that's no smaller quantity heartfelt for being in the form of a first-person poem.
Steve Dollar(Wall Street Journal): Mysterious and hermetic, this memoir is a collage of home movies, photographs, audio recordings and lyrical rehearsal that reframes a troubled family annals through a heartbroken lens.
Frank Scheck(Hollywood Reporter): This haunting and dreamlike cinematic effort is filmmaking at its most special.
Christy Lemire(RogerEbert.com): What began in beauteous, intriguing fashion ends up feeling surprisingly inanimate.
Stephen Holden(New York Times): "Elena" unfolds like a cinematic castle in the air whose central image is water, that symbolizes the washing away of grievance.
Alan Scherstuhl(Village Voice): A pained and rich summoning, Petra Costa's haunted doc Elena dances with death, memory, and family, seducing viewers and afterward breaking their hearts.
Dan Schindel(Movie Mezzanine): The thin skin drifts apart in its last strain, but that doesn't diminish the overall effort.
John Anderson(indieWIRE): Costa may not subsist detail-oriented when it comes to the minute particulars of her sister's personal history, but when it comes to creating emotional portraiture, she's exhaustive.
Katie Walsh(The Playlist): … a mesmerizing, snaky and emotional piece of filmmaking that consistently surprises and awes in its sensitivity and (to the degree that Herzog would say)ecstatic truths.
Maria Garcia(Film Journal International): Women's cinematic quests ~ the sake of identity are singular, as they in the same state often involve reminiscences of a dead referring … Elena adds another assured and courageous voice.
Diego Costa(Slant Magazine): This is a film about the invisible things passed along the course of from generation to generation, that polluted inheritance that cages us into patterns and puzzles we try to explain in someone else's note.
Pablo Villaca(Cinema em Cena): Um mergulho corajoso em mems dolorosas, perguntas nperguntadas e feridas ainda inflamadas.
Brian Tallerico(Film Threat): This is Elena and Petra's tale, and Costa never makes the required straining for it to feel universally suitable or of emotional impact to anyone goal their family.
Sarah Boslaugh(PopMatters): …a poetic, impressionistic documentary … combining new footage by home movies and other archival materials to take you in the interior of Petra's mind …

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Tuesday, June 17th, 2014 20:06 Comments Off

Blue Ruin

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Reviews:
Soren Anderson(Seattle Times): Blair, an unheralded actor, carries the whole picture. He's in practically each scene, and his performance is fascinating on this account that in his eyes you can visit the character struggling desperately with himself.
Ben Sachs(Chicago Reader): Saulnier makes striking use of silence and slow camera movements, allowing the rest to simmer until violence seems practically not to be escaped.
David Denby(New Yorker): Saulnier spills a doom of blood, but he's each extraordinarily responsible and appealing craftsman.
Bruce Ingram(Chicago Sun-Times): You couldn't request for a more unlikely avenger than the not well-equipped sort-of hero of Blue Ruin, and that's precisely for what cause it's far, far greater degree suspenseful than the typical violent avenge thriller.
Tom Long(Detroit News): A riveting revenge thriller written and directed by Jeremy Saulnier and built right and left a singular performance by Macon Blair.
Steven Rea(Philadelphia Inquirer): To dub Blue Ruin a revenge thriller is to betray this barbed-wire-sharp and fully surprising American indie short.
Philip Martin(Arkansas Democrat-Gazette): …a genre film, but it's not every empty-headed one. It's accessible in the same way Jim Thompson's infraction of law novels are …
Mike McGranaghan(Aisle Seat): Blue Ruin redefines the revenge picture. It continually creates moments of hold-your-breath suspense.
Wesley Morris(Grantland): Saulnier is moreover a cinematographer, and he's in perfect control of the film's conflation of human-flake horror and tragicomedy.
Chase Whale(Central Track): Blue Ruin is turbulent but it impressively avoids the glorification of homicide; instead, [director Jeremy] Saulnier deftly shows fair-minded how terrifying, unnerving, sad and overwhelming it is to take a life.
Frank Swietek(One Guy’s Opinion): A tight, taut, suspenseful small thriller…offering an effective series of tension-building sequences punctuated by outbursts of tumultuous action.
Donald Clarke(Irish Times): Though coloured ~ means of indie sensibilities, Blue Ruin offers the impetus of hard-edged pulp and the intestines of full-on exploitation cinema.
Josh Larsen(LarsenOnFilm): …a sad repudiation of the adage that requite is sweet.
John Beifuss(Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN)): Upends genre expectations ~ means of placing an unskilled, often hapless and physically undistinguished Everyman in the turbulent 'revenge' role that a Hollywood movie typically would designate to an invulnerable tough guy played ~ means of the likes of Liam Neeson…
Mark Kermode(Observer [UK]): A stripped-downward tale of revenge with bloodied hands and a blackened feeling, this viscerally intelligent thriller takes a repaired stab at an old genre with refreshingly distressing results.
John Hanlon(John Hanlon Reviews): Subtle and heartbreaking, this requital drama will be hard to neglect.
Ed Whitfield(The Ooh Tray): A elate noir that deserves to be seen, in the same state is its power and brutality.
Jason Best(Movie Talk): Revenge thriller Blue Ruin has at its midst that stock cinematic type, the grieving loner without ceasing a mission of retribution, yet Jeremy Saulnier's reduced-budget film is a world let us go. from the wish-fulfilment fantasy of the Death Wish movies and their ilk.
Michael Nordine(Willamette Week): Does a grand job of masking how little it has to say about the bloodshed it deals in.
Geoffrey Macnab(Independent): A excessively bloody film noir, directed with alarming ingenuity by Jeremy Saulnier, Blue Ruin benefits from its pared-on the ground style and macabre humour.
Padraic McKiernan(Irish Independent): Strong stoppage levels help maintain good momentum and Blair anchors proceedings admirably. The finale is a tad contrived, but in that place are enough twists and turns side by side the way to ensure that genre fans be inclined be suitably thrilled.
Allan Hunter(Daily Express): Director Jeremy Saulnier has taken more familiar ingredients and crafted them into a emaciated, flinty thriller that can stand relative estimate with the Coen Brothers' in good time efforts.

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014 19:06 Comments Off

Heropanti

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Tuesday, June 17th, 2014 19:06 Comments Off

The Quiet Ones

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Reviews:
Peter Keough(Boston Globe): "The Quiet Ones" alone has nothing to say.
Ernest Hardy(Village Voice): Unfortunately, it's every part of very familiar and somewhat tediously played abroad.
James Rocchi(Film.com): "The Quiet Ones" is rated PG-13, mete it's scarier than R-rated gorefests, like "Proxy," "Nurse 3D," and "American Mary." Anyone be able to create disgust; creating slowly-building anxiety is entirely another proposition.
Chris Nashawaty(Entertainment Weekly): A retro state of being possessed story that will wind up centre of life best remembered for its groovy '70s setting (lots of mutton-chap sideburns and T. Rex and Slade songs forward the soundtrack) and a deliciously sinister performance from Jared Harris.
Kiva Reardon(Globe and Mail): Hammer power be back, but the studio positive isn't hammering out anything that's slightly horrifying.
Stephen Whitty(Newark Star-Ledger): The narration doesn't make much perception, starting with a professor blithely conscious awarded custody of a dangerous ideal patient, and just going downhill from in that place.
John Beifuss(Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN)): Jared Harris would get fit in nicely alongside Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee back in Hammer's heyday.
Kelly Vance(East Bay Express): A highly watchable horror film, psychological shocker, or all that you want to call it.
Scott Weinberg(FEARnet): Well-range, well-acted and, well, kinda boring.
Steve Newall(Flicks.co.nz): We're hither for the scares and chills, and put ~ this front the film does sufficiency in building atmosphere and providing the essential frights to prove watchable.
Tim Brayton(Antagony & Ecstasy): [Nearly] works of the same kind with a horror-tinged chamber drama; then it is about spooky, underlit houses by inexplicable goings-on… it's purely adequate at best, and frequently not uniform that.
Jeffrey M. Anderson(Common Sense Media): Doesn't actually tell a story or develop at all kind of rising suspense or tingling chills likewise much as it presents a concatenation of jump-shocks and sudden, clamorous noises.
Drew Taylor(The Playlist): The movie does accept some nice takeaways, mostly to confer with Harris' gleefully unhinged performance…but they are few and alienated between.
Ken Hanke(Mountain Xpress (Asheville, NC)): The moot point with the film comes from a drift to not be able to set at liberty on its attempts at the Big Scares.
Margot Harrison(Seven Days): This last mentioned -day product of renowned UK awe brand Hammer Films has all the artifice of a county-fair scarehouse, and it's ready as scary.
Mark R. Leeper(Mark Leeper’s Reviews): If THE QUIET ONES is not a master-piece, at least it fails gracefully and the genre is preferable for its effort.
Steve Davis(Austin Chronicle): This scarcity of plausible narrative is either the ensue of lazy filmmaking or shortcut editing. Either interval, you lose.
Scott Tobias(The Dissolve): The film seems to mimic [Professor] Coupland's philosophical method: Throw everything into the cup, crank up the Bunsen burner, and trust the experiment works. In both cases, it doesn't.
A.A. Dowd(AV Club): The Quiet Ones is a in some degree ironic title for a horror thin skin whose primary scare tactic is to statedly crank up the volume, sending the needle to the red by a sudden spike in the decibel levels.
Steve Newton(SSG Syndicate): Its retro melding of [The Conjuring and Insidious] with a heavy dose of Carrie-diction telekinetic mayhem doesn't eventuate in anything particularly memorable. Apart from the Slade, that is.
John Urbancich(Your Movies (cleveland.com)): Such a with truth uneasy and atmospheric ride leads to the whole of hell breaking loose in a wrong last reel that leaves conclusions up to material interpretation.
Andrea Chase(Killer Movie Reviews): ~y elegant little flick, both creepy and aerial, that tells its tale of hubris and precious intentions gone wrong with a wilful seriousness
Kevin Carr(7M Pictures): For total the set-up and atmosphere, the narrative completely unravels in the final act.

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014 19:06 Comments Off

Borgman

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Reviews:
Tirdad Derakhshani(Philadelphia Inquirer): Filled with surreal touches and shocking scenes of inky humor, Borgman steams ahead with the sway and inevitability of a nightmare.
Andrew O’Hehir(Salon.com): [An] exceptionally disturbing thin skin
Stephen Holden(New York Times): The chronicle's magic is black, its disloyalty driven by evil spirits.
Kyle Smith(New York Post): A palling horror parable disguised as a comedy of mores, the Netherlands' "Borgman" is a tenuity: a genuinely shocking, upsetting movie.
Stephanie Zacharek(Village Voice): The likeness is fascinating for the way it introduces the kernel of every idea and then builds on it slowly, sustaining suspension rather than just leading the auditory right up to the "OK, I reach it" moment and running disclosed of steam.
Sasha Stone(TheWrap): In some era where there are very scarcely any truly surprising films, Borgman is unit of the rare movies that manages to discovery something entirely new to say, by original, oddly drawn characters.
Eric D. Snider(About.com): This droll, subtly nightmarish tale could be the growing well brain-boink you've been hungering.
Josh Kupecki(Austin Chronicle): At a time which time modern films pummel you over the seat of the brain with their intentions, van Warmerdam's dubiousness in mapping out Borgman's relentless agenda will hopefully fuel many rewarding, station-screening discussions.
Matt Prigge(Metro): That it in no degree adds up to anything is a accountableness – it plays like 'Dogtooth' without the drive – and the secret to its exceptional success. After all, it never lets up.
Bilge Ebiri(Vulture): You may light upon yourself chuckling at Borgman as plenteous as you recoil at it. It's destined with regard to cult status.
Brian Formo(CraveOnline): The Dutch oddity "Borgman" is sometimes playful, sometimes invigorating, but mysterious to a blemish.
Brian Tallerico(RogerEbert.com): "Borgman" be able to sometimes frustrate but it is some accomplished piece of work, driven ~ the agency of a uniquely malevolent tonal balance and pair fantastic central performances.
Laura Clifford(Reeling Reviews): What's chiefly effective about "Borgman" is Bijvoet's salmagundi of aggressive boldness and reason, his 'creepy crawling' surrounding his benefactress's home flat leading to the repeated invasion of her dreams, a homeless goblin.
Louis Proyect(rec.arts.movies.reviews): A home incursion movie that is more Godard than grindhouse, and a refulgent one at that.
Mike D’Angelo(AV Club): With in the way that many outrlements and so few harden answers, Borgman certainly has the makings of a system film, which seems very much ~ means of design. Too much by design, arguably …
Brian Orndorf(Blu-intellectual light.com): It's a disturbing prominent part, flirting with incomprehensibility at times, only its way with mounting unpleasantness is frequently masterful, tilted with moments of horrible comedy.
Tim Grierson(Paste Magazine): "Borgman" is a movie touching the way that families fall apart in the absence of ever realizing it until the gross house collapses. Or maybe it's here and there psychic vampires. Maybe both.
Ryan Lattanzio(Thompson forward Hollywood): A nasty, insane, mind-affecting and unpredictable piece of work
Jeff Meyers(Metro Times (Detroit, MI)): It's the complacent of movie where no one behaves like a actual person ought to and a chance of the plot doesn't arrive at sense but you can't ameliorate but be pulled into its eerie, along-kilter web of menace.
Roger Moore(McClatchy-Tribune News Service): Maddeningly impenetrable, but it gets away with not playing ~ means of the rules. Somehow.

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014 18:06 Comments Off

Royal Shakespeare Company: Henry IV Part 1

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Tuesday, June 17th, 2014 18:06 Comments Off

Rio 2

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Reviews:
Rafer Guzman(Newsday): The movie has any goal: to amuse the most children by the least amount of effort.
Alonso Duralde(TheWrap): The harmonious moments, on the whole, stand out as the highlights of the pellicle; Rio 2 becomes watchable when the flat characters shut up and sing.
Liam Lacey(Globe and Mail): Where the pellicle excels … in an even more pronounced way than the first film, is in the choreographed animation for the musical numbers.
Tirdad Derakhshani(Philadelphia Inquirer): It'll take care of the kids content for a coupling of hours, though it's credible to bore the grown-ups.
Bill Zwecker(Chicago Sun-Times): It's while good as the first one and certain to please both the kiddies and adults by its two-tiered humor.
Betsy Sharkey(Los Angeles Times): Wonderfully buoyant and well-voiced, "Rio 2" is not at all the less too much. Too much plot, in addition many issues, too many characters.
Michael Dequina(TheMovieReport.com): So a great deal of is going on here, yet not at all of consequence feels like it's *happening*.
Jeff Vice(Cinephiled): The contrive … borrows very heavily from some of Ben Stiller's live-activity hits, in particular a trio of comedies that, like this would-be 'series,' also worse and other crass as the follow-up films were churned ~right in assembly line fashion."
Todd Jorgenson(Cinemalogue.com): … a courtly but shallow follow-up lacking the freshness of each original that was mediocre in the foremost place.
Louis Black(Austin Chronicle): All singing, whole dancing, all color: Rio 2 is a recent, studio animation blockbuster spilling all by the place, rather than arching into the canopy of heaven.
Tim Brayton(Antagony & Ecstasy): A distinguished decline in every way from an original that really couldn't supply it.
Alynda Wheat(People Magazine): The derived Rio 2 is a riot of paint with groovy music, but not a ingenuous original moment to its name.
Dave White(Movies.com): There'll have ~ing a Rio 3. Probably a Rio 4. They power of determination be brightly colored and not pother anyone. You'll simultaneously remember them in some degree fondly and also not remember abundant about them at all. "That some bird," you'll entertain an idea of, "he was ok."
Peter Canavese(Groucho Reviews): Rio was in some degree generic to begin with, and the come-up doesn't fly more distant from the nest…[it's the] vocally virtuosic tender aria, 'Poisonous Love,' that is the similitude's hands-down highlight.
Susan Granger(SSG Syndicate): A mad, family-friendly, musical adventure that's filled by familiar feathered friends.
Andrea Chase(Killer Movie Reviews): bucks the every-day law of diminishing sequel returns through a great story, even better repaired dangers, and a voice performance through Kristen Chenowith as Gabi, a lovesick corrupt dart frog that is destined to become a classic.
Sandy Schaefer(ScreenRant): Enjoyable symphony and traces of authentic Brazilian meaning provide reasonable compensation for Rio 2's derivative qualities and storytelling flaws (if sole barely so).
Radheyan Simonpillai(NOW Toronto): Presents a rancorous sweep of bright colours impeccably choreographed to samba, R&B and bestow tunes. Amidst all the revelry, the priggish plot and characters garner as a great deal of attention as the wheels on a carnival barter.
Jeanne Kaplan(Kaplan vs. Kaplan): "Rio 2" is a frolicsome, colorful, amusing 3D computer-animated venture.
David Kaplan(Kaplan vs. Kaplan): Saldanha's termination is infused with spectacular scenery, toe-tapping symphony, and a myriad of creatures and banner.
Katherine Monk(Canada.com): The colour and sounds of Brazil render certain Rio 2 keeps its exotic plumage, but the plot and pastiche characters arrive straight out of Southern California's massy fat fanny pack.
Wesley Morris(Grantland): Rio 2 has a puerile, delicious-looking beauty. It's like vigilance a box of Froot Loops burst just beyond the tip of your nose. Bring milk.
Kirk Baird(Toledo Blade): Director and cowriter Carlos Saldanha's thin skin is, above all, a spectacular CG travelogue of his indigenous Brazil, with a virtual zoo of Amazonian residents in their otherworldly characteristic habitats.
Steve Persall(Tampa Bay Times): Like its peppy elder, Rio 2 doesn't seem or sound like other animated licenses to im~ money. That alone is reason enough to appreciate it.

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014 18:06 Comments Off

The Discoverers

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Reviews:
Sheri Linden(Los Angeles Times): Dunne creates a full-blooded character. The film around him, unfortunately, takes softly-key to the realm of lukewarm.
Ben Kenigsberg(New York Times): "The Discoverers" counters its various contrivances with relaxed pacing and some evocative sense of the American woodlands by bonfire light.
Graham Fuller(New York Daily News): The unusually gray Dunne excels. Sadly, the movie is marred through tepid, often crass comedy.
Lou Lumenick(New York Post): Writer-counsellor Schwarz has a lot of frolic with this nutty premise. And in greater numbers important, the twisted dynamics of this noteworthy family ring true.
Heather Baysa(Village Voice): Schwarz is clearly draining from the same bag of tricks in the same proportion that many of his indie comedy predecessors, no more than he's refining them. Even his spacious, Wes Anderson-ian compositions have a purpose.
Ronnie Scheib(Variety): Schwarz lacks the instrument chops to adequately embed the striking qualities's predictable learning curve into a richer tale fabric, but Dunne's perf is degree of slope-perfect.
Eric D. Snider(About.com): A medium but upbeat entry in the ~ical books of forgettable (but pleasant!) independent comedies.
Christine N. Ziemba(Paste Magazine): A smart script and an endearing father-daughter affinity between veteran actor Griffin Dunne and Madeleine Martin save it from becoming too formulaic.
Leonard Maltin(Leonard Maltin’s Picks): It's fine in scale but well worth sight, especially if (like me) you've missed for the reason that Griffin Dunne.
Rob Hunter(Film School Rejects): The Discoverers is a handsome little film that succeeds emotionally and comedically expressions of gratitude to its dialogue and two outstrip performances.
Jordan Hoffman(The Dissolve): This walk of first view gets lost in the woods.
Marshall Fine(Hollywood & Fine): Griffin Dunne, an under-appreciated actor, hasn't had a role this honorable in ages – and he makes the greatest number of it.
Matt Patches(Hollywood.com): The Discoverers gets ruined in woods of indie land at ages, with a few of its asides fine ~ arbitrary and reaching jokes, but Schwarz assembled the make skilful make expert cast to tell his story.
John Petkovic(Cleveland Plain Dealer): It's in the wood , where the family and the pellicle both come together. Both become captivating thanks to more than functional performances of Griffin Dunne in the manner that the dad; Madeleine Martin, as the daughter; and Cara Buono.
John Hazelton(Screen International): A ragtag re-act of the Lewis and Clark promptness is the backdrop for The Discoverers, the sweetly amusing tale of a dysfunctional fresh family trying to work out its issues.
Jordan Osterer(Slant Magazine): It pushes itself at a distance before shrill predictability in its willingness to accuse the public and familial histories at its heart.

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