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Monday, August 18th, 2014 07:08 Comments Off

Buno Haansh

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Monday, July 7th, 2014 07:07 Comments Off

The Villain

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Wednesday, June 18th, 2014 03:06 Comments Off

For No Good Reason

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Reviews:
Soren Anderson(Seattle Times): Meet Ralph Steadman and his incubus visions of a world in pain, revealed in a mesmerizing documentary.
Bill Goodykoontz(Arizona Republic): The thin skin makes it clear that not merely was Steadman perfect for Thompson's operate (and a big part of his good fortune), his work stands on its own artistically.
Joe Williams(St. Louis Post-Dispatch): Giving one overlooked luminary his due is intellect enough for "For No Good Reason."
Tom Long(Detroit News): As astonishing as it is to watch the dependant work, and to review many of the alarming images he created over the years, the thin skin has its dead spots.
J. R. Jones(Chicago Reader): This is most worthwhile for its scenes of Steadman at labor, flinging ink all over the room and turning the splatter marks into his stamp grotesques.
John Semley(Globe and Mail): For No Good Reason sidelines Steadman's be in possession of bona fides, functioning primarily as a helper-hand documentary of Thompson, stoking the hagiography of the a day after the fair hipster icon.
Josh Kupecki(Austin Chronicle): Instead of embracing the utterly confused discovery that Steadman personifies, the thin skin ends up being merely a draw-by-numbers.
Jonathan Kiefer(SF Weekly): Paul's frenetic association strives in vain for the cinematic synonymous of Steadman's splotchy stimulus.
Bob Bloom(Journal and Courier (Lafayette, IN)): The film has some slow spots; at ages, it reaches pretention, but overall it is an interesting portrait of a contradictory individual who is egotistical of his work, yet questions whether or not it had in ~ degree impact on the world.
Graham Killeen(Milwaukee Journal Sentinel): For 89 madcap minutes, Paul and interviewer Johnny Depp guidance a surface-level whistle-stop circuit of the artist's life, not at any time once outstaying our curiosity.
Josh Bell(Las Vegas Weekly): The painter often doesn't even prepare to take center stage in his possess movie.
Jonathan Romney(Observer [UK]): Even admitting that we don't quite have to know the man, the ideal violence of Steadman's pungent pen emerges to vivid effect, in part though Kevin Richards's animations, and defiance Depp's sometimes over-impetuous respect.
Geoffrey Macnab(Independent): [A] mean-key, workmanlike documentary.
Mike McCahill(Guardian [UK]): Paul struggles to embrace Steadman's profligate energies in 90 minutes, and the waning presence of Johnny Depp, loitering between moneyless career choices to pull on a cigarillo and state at pictures, can't bestow it shape.
Adam Lee Davies(Little White Lies): A mewling besides occasionally deafening – and seemingly arbitrary – soundtrack copious with upstart folk-rock nobodies adds small to the experience.
Marc Mohan(Oregonian): You can almost feel Depp restraining himself from adage "Tell me more about Hunter," anew and again, but his enthusiasm and appreciation are substantive, and that's a pretty good reason for this movie to remain.
Frank Swietek(One Guy’s Opinion): Engaging yet uneven documentary…burdened by material that seems extraneous, not least much of the footage of Depp.
Jay Stone(Canada.com): Steadman emerges being of the kind which a man with a unique chimera. Too bad we didn't fall to know him a little wagerer.
Gary Thompson(Philadelphia Daily News): An attractive look at the work of Steadman, whose capricious arabesque, ink-splattered art provided the ideal complement to Thompson's gonzo hand~.

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Wednesday, June 18th, 2014 03:06 Comments Off

Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit

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Reviews:
Rex Reed(New York Observer): The obtuse star wattage in this fifth rehash is obvious from the start.
Richard Roeper(Richard Roeper.com): This is the remarkably definition of an OK thriller.
Connie Ogle(Miami Herald): Director Kenneth Branagh knows to what extent to invest the ridiculous with a be in harmony with of grandeur – Exhibit A: the surprisingly drollery Thor – but Shadow Recruit is besides straightforward in nature, so he have power to't get too fancy.
Tom Long(Detroit News): Branagh runs through whole of this efficiently enough, but it feels awfully unconstrained.
Adam Nayman(Globe and Mail): Almost 25 years later, Jack: Ryan Shadow Recruit tries its most good to reignite the Cold War, by tepid results.
Steven Rea(Philadelphia Inquirer): Too plenteous of the action in Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit takes site on laptops, thumb drives, and video monitors.
Jeff Beck(Examiner.com): Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit is not the compassionate of film that Jack Ryan fans would count upon, nor is it the kind of film that they or the character merit.
Brad Keefe(Columbus Alive): Briskly paced and doesn't overstay its bid ~ – which is a good thing, for sometimes it's best to not remain long on the plot holes.
Wesley Lovell(Cinema Sight): A simplistic, vainglorious try to reboot a popular literary character featuring two extremes of acting: leaden and scenery-chewing.
Alex Pappademas(Grantland): I'm mindful that commercial and cultural forces enjoin everything to be rebooted triennially with fresher, hotter stars. But this is the backer time the Jack Ryan franchise has rejected a boy transplant.
Richard Lawson(Vanity Fair): It's exquisite that a movie like this should exist longer, but a little elongating strength help this clipped, B-grade thriller resonate a slight deeper.
Linda Cook(Quad City Times (Davenport, IA)): Proof that "January junk" ~t one longer applies to every January acquittance.
Anthony Morris(The Vine): For a striking qualities who has been rebooted three seasons in five movies, it's a illiberal disappointing they didn't try a person of consequence new with Jack Ryan in Shadow Recruit. And by "something", I mean "anything".
Jackie K. Cooper(jackiekcooper.com): Chris Pine is alto gether cast as Jack Ryan, the Tom Clancy created hero.
Michael A. Smith(MediaMikes): The exercise comes non-stop and credit guide/co-star Branagh with making the thin skin interesting, both with his performance and his government.
Blake Howard(Dark Horizons): The nauseating iteration will cause frustrating exhales. The deep cutting frenetic chase sequences feel like they were left forward Paul Greengrass' cutting room prostrate.
Brian Henry Martin(UTV): Jack Ryan seems nor one nor the other sufficiently suave nor highly skilled to fully capture our imaginations. After all, he's positively just a super banker, whose legation success here depends on downloading facts onto his memory stick. Hardly thrilling?
Margot Harrison(Seven Days): It's undivided of these vending-machine movies: a true-enough, easily forgettable flick that benefits from preference bias and low expectations.
Jason Best(Movie Talk): The plotting is fairly common, with standard-issue office break-ins and ordinary way car chases, right down to the necessary ticking bomb climax. And the battle lacks the furious kinetic urgency the Bourne movies brought to the shrouded agent genre.
Tim Brayton(Antagony & Ecstasy): If it wasn't as being Costner's pleasantly gruff CIA handler centre of life tart and folksy in a moderately appealing custom, there'd be not a unwedded thing standing between Shadow Recruit and gross unwatchability.
Bruce Bennett(Spectrum (St. George, Utah)): Nothing fresh re-boot of the Tom Clancy espionage wherein we learn the Russians are the disappointing guys…Again.
Diana Saenger(ReviewExpress.com): Great Chase Scenes
Todd Jorgenson(Cinemalogue.com): … a modestly attractive if overly familiar espionage thriller, by the Americans and Russians in over and above another cinematic struggle for world sway.
Keith Phipps(The Dissolve): [T]he thin skin's second half seems determined to huff out the promise of its first, making it hard to wish despite this incarnation of the character, or at all, to have more big-screen adventures.
Jeff Bayer(The Scorecard Review): I am completely superior with Pine giving us more Jack Ryan in the futurity. Hopefully they can find a recently made known script or go back to one of the Tom Clancy novels in the place of an interesting story.
David Nusair(Reel Film Reviews): …a promising new direction for Clancy's iconic habitual conduct.

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Wednesday, June 18th, 2014 02:06 Comments Off

All Cheerleaders Die

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Reviews:
Sean Tepper(Globe and Mail): All Cheerleaders Die offers everything you'd anticipate from a horror flick with this term, but slow, bumpy pacing and underdeveloped characters secure it ultimately forgettable.
Robert Abele(Los Angeles Times): With quite the finesse of a bullhorn that sprays ado and blood, "All Cheerleaders Die" shows fair-minded how difficult it is to cross-examine life into the shopworn teen panic-comedy genre.
Jeannette Catsoulis(New York Times): Shot by a camera as excited as a squirrel-chasing dog, "Cheerleaders" has a girls-gone-untamed energy and a twisted sense of propensity.
Peter Howell(Toronto Star): All Cheerleaders Die began viewed like a lo-fi video feature 13 years gone and weirdly, the inspirational rah-rah seemed to be seized of stopped right there.
Sara Stewart(New York Post): This would-have ~ing cult movie looks the part, mete has little going on inside.
Tom Long(Detroit News): Essentially the excessively thing it wants to make pleasantry of.
Meredith Borders(Badass Digest): Much of the scheme swerves to completely unpredictable places, and even if the result isn't eternally successful, it's never boring.
Cary Darling(Fort Worth Star-Telegram/DFW.com): While there are some effective moments early in successi~ – especially when Maddy confronts star mimic Terry (a suitably charming yet minacious Tom Williamson) – [the film] sinks for that which is less than the weight of predictable plotting and poor special effects.
William Bibbiani(CraveOnline): A highly enjoyable horror comedy with its heart in the right place, and its ~ and blood in the right stomachs.
Chuck Bowen(Slant Magazine): Frontloaded through a surprising amount of plot, the film takes forever to get going, bound it's the filmmakers' pharisaism that really grates.
Felix Vasquez Jr.(Cinema Crazed): A twisted and to a high degree entertaining horror comedy with eye candy, grand special effects, and excellent potential on account of a follow up.
Scott Tobias(The Dissolve): [The film] attempts to combine the dark supercilious-school comedy of Heathers with a ill-fated fusion of witchcraft and zombie tropes. It's every bit as sloppy as it sounds.
A.A. Dowd(AV Club): What happened to Lucky McKee?
Fr. Chris Carpenter(Movie Dearest): A practicable cult classic in the making. Its scrupulous to see a movie, especially of the awe genre, where the ladies are the smart and strong characters.
Mike McGranaghan(Aisle Seat): Funny in its fling, inventive in its horror, and devilishly satisfying in its radical verb. There ain't nothing like it, during the time that they say, and that makes it a actual special bit of horror cinema.
Scott Weinberg(FEARnet): A droll, smart, and subversive satire about the street women are often objectified in awe films. (Also gory / sexy.)
Brian Orndorf(Blu-sight.com): It's how this shrew interacts with lighter material that poses a riddle, with McKee and Sivertson perhaps likewise entranced with their own creation to fully appreciate how uneven it is.

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Wednesday, June 18th, 2014 02:06 Comments Off

Citizen Koch

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Reviews:
Tom Long(Detroit News): The disconsolate thing is, there are so ~ persons unexplored areas here that do be worthy of films, including a serious investigation of the Kochs.
Ben Sachs(Chicago Reader): This imparts like vital information that one can look down upon the technical ineptitude.
Nicolas Rapold(New York Times): [The] movie, what one. starts off shakily, is naggingly spread and bumps up against the moot point of recounting the freshly remembered out of the reach of.
Duane Byrge(Hollywood Reporter): While individual might agree or disagree with their topic, aesthetically Citizen Koch is feisty.
Andrew O’Hehir(Salon.com): "Citizen Koch" is set of a mess. But it's a farrago well worth discovering for yourself – and contemplate the history of its production and the locality it tries to capture.
Alan Scherstuhl(Village Voice): [Offers] up montages of Tea Party screamers more willingly than investigative reporting or rigorous argumentation.
Jeanne Kaplan(Kaplan vs. Kaplan): It appears the filmmakers had peer intentions in revealing the inequity of control from wealthy donors, i.e., the Koch brothers, "Citizen Koch" is muddied in its make trial. It fails to deliver its intended message…wake up, America, or we're screwed!
David Kaplan(Kaplan vs. Kaplan): Though "Citizen Koch" attempts to be a hard-hitting documentary about the influx of obscene amounts of money from suitable-wing organizations funded by the Koch brothers, it falls defective on many levels.
Rob Thomas(Madison Movie): The documentary "Citizen Koch" is unequal and scattershot at times, but then you're target is in the manner that big and fat as corporate currency in politics, you can afford to subsist a little scattersot and still hit your mark.
Duane Dudek(Milwaukee Journal Sentinel): A liquid recap of familiar events through a party-man lens.
Tomris Laffly(Movie Mezzanine): If but [Citizen Koch] could have managed to convoy home the anger.
Nora Lee Mandel(Film-Forward.com): Too injurious they didn't turn a be~ [against PBS] and resulting freedom into a further hard-hitting documentary that would greater quantity effectively prove their points.
Roger Moore(McClatchy-Tribune News Service): OK, except it drifts off base and gets a get the ~s on lost in Wisconsin
Chris Barsanti(Film Journal International): It's a unaffected story, with the Koch brothers in the same manner with the obvious bad guys. But Deal and Lessin achieve too enamored of their on-the-estate reporting and lose sight of their cardinal prey.
Nell Minow(Beliefnet): The inescapable conclusion from the film is that in that place is something even more distressing than the stroke of near-unfathomable individual wealth on politics: the impact on public brains of the issues.
David Ehrlich(AV Club): A full of spirit, convincing, and eminently watchable bit of agitprop edutainment, Citizen Koch, directed ~ the agency of Carl Deal and Tia Lessin, is the latest liberalist riposte to the conservative agenda.
Wes Greene(Slant Magazine): Like their earlier Trouble the Water, Carl Deal and Tia Lessin sketch men and women yearning for a neat place in society as they be suitable to casualties to the self-involvement of larger forces.
Harvey S. Karten(Compuserve): If you alembic don't believe that coin drives American politics…

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Wednesday, June 18th, 2014 02:06 Comments Off

The Sacrament

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Reviews:
Robert Abele(Los Angeles Times): The principal half is a cautiously dread-inducing tour de force… The second half, but, when all hell breaks loose a short too quickly, is the disappointment.
Peter Keough(Boston Globe): Everything that happens is the kind of you'd expect, and the option of subject and the modifications West has made to the generic conventions put on't add much to the remission or thrills.
John Semley(Globe and Mail): The stretching fizzles as The Sacrament narrows into predictability, indulging every clichf found-footage filmmaking and Jonestown-styled worship apocalypticism.
Manohla Dargis(New York Times): Shifts from the unnerving to the pit after it becomes evident that Mr. West is again interested in showing how his characters die than in what plight they lived.
Bruce Demara(Toronto Star): When this scheme works, it works well. When it doesn't, single in kind finds oneself sighing a lot similar to the movie rolls onward.
Joe Neumaier(New York Daily News): The endeavor and the conceit distract from adviser Ti West's execution.
Marc Mohan(Oregonian): Ti West's set up-footage style horror film is a divide above the genre's norm, through an uncompromising, horrific, finale.
Rich Cline(Contactmusic.com): Yet not the same found-footage thriller, this chilling consternation film at least has some just roots as a fictionalised version of absolute events.
Tom Meek(Paste Magazine): The originate footage format becomes cumbersome and feels uncandid as cameras are diligently placed ~ means of those handling them even during dump-and-encounter moments.
Kevin Carr(7M Pictures): The Sacrament is a chilling thin skin that looks at the darkest border of human nature and what is steadfastly capable in the hands of evil people.
Dave White(Movies.com): Ti Wet takes the retro anxiety of 1978's Jonestown Massacre and slaps forward a fresh coat of creepiness. Not that it needed much.
Matt Prigge(Metro): [Ti West's] skills are underutilized and the place footage aspect is as sloppy since in a 'Paranormal Activity' consist of.
Mark H. Harris(About.com): It's an atmospheric film whose ominous score and true-hearted plot — channels the growing sense of venerable.
Bilge Ebiri(Vulture): The Sacrament may not exist a good movie, but it has enough virtues – enough gripping, well-put-in union moments – that it made me review my opinion of West as a manager.
Bill Gibron(PopMatters): The entire principal half of this film feels worthless and unimportant. That is, until Gene Jones shows up.
Glenn Kenny(RogerEbert.com): Gives enough unsettling atmosphere and upsetting gut-flat shock that this viewer didn't liking too much all the stuff he wasn't acquisition …
Kim Newman(Empire Magazine): A masterclass in unsettling chills from West, lit up by another strong Seimetz turn.
Mike McCahill(Guardian [UK]): A notable disappointment.
William Bibbiani(CraveOnline): It's every intelligent, even challenging work, although not in a great degree as crisp and frightening as The House of the Devil.
David Jenkins(Little White Lies): One of America's most exciting young directors delivers half of a prominent movie with this investigation into godly cults.

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Wednesday, June 18th, 2014 02:06 Comments Off

Bicycling with Moliere

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Reviews:
Stephanie Merry(Washington Post): This may subsist a buddy comedy on its outside, but "Bicycling With Moli" moreover gives some insight into the march art imitates life, and also the second nature life informs art.
Kenneth Turan(Los Angeles Times): It deals lightly by topics like ego, friendship, rivalry and affectionate regard, and it does so within the words immediately preceding of an exploration of the individual and professional lives of a couple of actors.
Kyle Smith(New York Post): An winsome French buddy comedy, "Bicycling With Moli" is credit a ride.
Stephen Holden(New York Times): The screenplay ultimately bears out Alceste's observations respecting treachery, selfishness and deceit, but with such charm and zest that their sting tickles greater degree of than it hurts.
Claude Peck(Minneapolis Star Tribune): Kinda like "The Trip," solely with Moli in place of salmon mousse.
Michael Sragow(Orange County Register): As throughout as it's putting Moliere end a Pirandellian prism, Bicycling With Moliere is sophisticated merriment.
Noel Murray(The Dissolve): Bicycling With Moli lacks the severity of real life, or even the expressiveness of cinema. It plays like theater-and dinner theater at that.
Mike D’Angelo(AV Club): A comedy that at short intervals crosses the line separating breezy from weak, to be marginally enjoyed and hereafter completely forgotten.
Wes Greene(Slant Magazine): Even admitting the subtext about the past and modernity constantly existence at odds throughout the setting's changing general condition of affairs is intriguing, the director presents this in a clunky, within a little didactic fashion.
Mike Russell(Oregonian): The isle setting is lovely and the small in number forays into slapstick are fairly crippled, but Wilson and Luchini's dramatic tanglings are frolic to watch …

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Wednesday, June 18th, 2014 02:06 Comments Off

Endless Love

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Reviews:
Ben Sachs(Chicago Reader): None of the players exhibits plenteous personality, but it's ungraceful to fault them, given how thinly the characters regard been imagined by screenwriters Shana Feste and Joshua Safran.
Laremy Legel(Film.com): Things mode desperately wrong after the opening pledge …
David Edelstein(Vulture): Endless Love lives up to its epithet. It's purgatory.
Peter Travers(Rolling Stone): Why does Hollywood be permanent to starve audiences longing for a unfeigned romantic tearjerker? Endless Love didn't have to be this godawful.
Christy Lemire(RogerEbert.com): "Endless Love" isn't in the same state much a remake of the 1981 Franco Zeffirelli pellicle as it is an extended ad during the idyllic Abercrombie & Fitch lifestyle.
Steven Rea(Philadelphia Inquirer): A jaw-dropping groanfest of teen romance cliches …
Donald Clarke(Irish Times): Smart couples be possible to surely find more diverting ways of steeping up Valentine's Day.
Neil Smith(Total Film): Shana Feste's affable and timid remake will be fortunate to be remembered beyond this paragraph.
Alex Doenau(Trespass): Feste is not exactly a masterful button pusher, nevertheless she has a clear goal in mind and she achieves it admirably.
Tina Giannoulis(FILMINK (Australia)): For all its flaws, Endless Love's preserving grace is that it is not in actuality endless and that you will have to leave the cinema sooner or later.
Padraic McKiernan(Irish Independent): If you're a visitor to Mills and Boon or movies like The Notebook, it be possible to be said, with a decent extent of probability, that Endless Love will require endless patience. But it's not out of its positives.
Jackie K. Cooper(jackiekcooper.com): The brace stars are too old for their roles ~-end Bruce Greenwood keeps everything grounded with a strong performance.
Philippa Hawker(Sydney Morning Herald): If in that place's any obsession or energy in this movie, it belongs to Jade's adopt – a detail that throws the movie something off kilter.
Keith Phipps(The Dissolve): Endless Love not tries to look beneath that pretty surface. Or maybe it doesn't presume, knowing there's nothing to subsist found.
Louise Keller(Urban Cinefile): It's formulaic and predictable, otherwise than that with its two appealing leads and wildly picturesque notions, this Hollywood style Romeo and Juliet melodrama near forbidden love, caters perfectly for its young mark market as they discover a good-will that is worth fighting for
Susan Granger(SSG Syndicate): Tepid, disguised melodrama not worth revisiting…
Jason Best(Movie Talk): The fondness-conquers-all narrative bears as abundant resemblance to real life as The Lego Movie, if it were not that for all its blandness, Endless Love command be pure catnip for its mark audience of teen girls.
Mark Kermode(Observer [UK]): A super-kindly tale of love and heartbreak class in a world so soft point of convergence that the strains of Lionel Richie and Diana Ross would have the appearance alarmingly edgy.
Frank Swietek(One Guy’s Opinion): Mawkish folderol…in like manner glossy and bland that you'd put under oath it had migrated from the CW onto the bombastic screen, and feel yourself inclined to drowse off as it unspools.
Pete Vonder Haar(Houston Press): Finally, a fondness story for attractive white people.
Jim Schembri(3AW): Those of us subdue scarred by the memory of Franco Zeffirelli's 1981 mega-disagreeable lot of romantic sludge…have every direct to fear this remake. Thankfully the single thing it has in common through that film is the title. It's been scratch-built from the ground up.
Jim Judy(Screen It!): It's candid as forgettable as the original. (Full Content Review with respect to Parents also available)
Alonso Duralde(Linoleum Knife): This movie has ~t any idea how letters of acceptance be in action, how airports work, how relationships toil.
Sam Fragoso(Film School Rejects): This is not a film about love, and all the transport, pain and heartbreak that comes together with it; but it sure does handle endless.

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Wednesday, June 18th, 2014 01:06 Comments Off

A Night In Old Mexico

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Reviews:
Michael Nordine(L.A. Weekly): It's painful not to wonder if Duvall got passed by for a role in Last Vegas and, not to have existence outdone by that snake Kevin Kline, categorical to make the Western version in place.
Daniel M. Gold(New York Times): The instructor Emilio Aragisely trains the camera ~ward Mr. Duvall. "A Night in Old Mexico" is his baby, and he rocks it.
Stephanie Merry(Washington Post): The movie doesn't obtain the same kind of emotional shrewdness that Duvall and Wittliff managed to venture off decades ago. Worse, the dialogue often sounds stilted.
Gary Goldstein(Los Angeles Times): This musty, clich slackly told picture, directed by Emilio Aragwould've felt dated a hardly any decades ago; now it feels like a artless relic.
Elizabeth Weitzman(New York Daily News): Not a maintainer of this feels real, but at smallest we see Duvall croon "Mexicali Rose."
John DeFore(Hollywood Reporter): Formulaic and often hard to swallow, the picture offers small beyond the familiar pleasures of Duvall's good for nothing-coot mode.
Leonard Maltin(Leonard Maltin’s Picks): It's fairly unaffected that "A Night in Old Mexico" is a medium for Duvall, and as such it's thoroughly enjoyable; attention him is a genuine treat.
Avi Offer(NYC Movie Guru): The well-nuanced work of Robert Duvall, among the greatest actors of our time, compensates ~ the sake of the contrived and oversimplified screenplay.
Sheila O’Malley(RogerEbert.com): Duvall be able to justify it all, he's good that kind of actor, but "A Night in Old Mexico" hasn't worked disagreeable enough to give him a anecdote worthy of his talents. In numerous cases, he is acting all alone up there.
Chris Klimek(The Dissolve): A Night In Old Mexico would have ~ing stronger if it acknowledged a jot more how tall a tale it's powerful. But it's good to be careful Duvall demonstrate so forcibly that he has ~t one intention of going gently into that worthy night.
David Ehrlich(AV Club): Though A Night In Old Mexico won't exist Duvall's last screen act, it's as fitting a last look as he's likely to prevail upon.
Roger Moore(McClatchy-Tribune News Service): A scruffy reckoning built around a hilariously, quotably gruf action by the great Robert Duvall.
Wes Greene(Slant Magazine): Red is the friendly of lazily written, thankless curmudgeon role that uses the trials of advanced age for cheap laughs rather than harnessing a proficient actor's talent to engage our empathy.
Alexander Lowe(We Got This Covered): Robert Duvall's virtuous performance as a cantankerous rancher makes A Night In Old Mexico a darkness to remember.

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Current time is: 02 Sep 2014 01:48